Promoting the Oneness of Humanity

Copyright 2o14-2017. UnityWorks Foundation. All Rights Reserved..

- A student response to the lessons - 

"UNITY is the ladder to climb

the wall of PREJUDICE."

I finished lesson two yesterday. One of the other fourth-grade teachers was listening in and she told me she couldn’t believe how engaged the kids were (this is a very difficult group). She said, “How amazing these lessons are. They’ve caught the kids’ imagination and curiosity completely!” 

We did the machine lesson—how the different parts of the machine work together in unity. They really get this idea of unity in diversity, and it was so wonderful to hear these kids, each one, explain what the concept is to the whole class. 

With the small group discussion questions, I put the kids in pairs and did a speed discussion.  I read the question and gave them one minute to discuss it. After each pair reported back, we switched partners for the next question. They loved it! They were engaged and involved, each one focused on discussing the question with their partner and then taking turns reporting their ideas back to the whole class. 

​Lesson three went great! I showed pictures of the faces on the screen using the download pack and held up the colored paper to the screen. It was very easy—just a few minutes of prep time! What a graphic, visual way of showing that we are all shades of tan/brown. The kids (and I) were really taken by this concept. It was so clear. This is really a powerful curriculum!

Your Stories (page 3)


From Dr. Susan Walker

Elementary/Middle School Teacher

Seattle, Washington, USA


I shared the first Teaching Unity PowerPoint last week with two fourth-grade classes—along with the donkey example, the gym shoe discussion and the word puzzles. It was a great lesson! The kids were engaged and interested.     

We were talking about how we really are one human family, about the science and genetics, and one girl said, “But people don't treat each other like we are one family.”  
It was very poignant from a rather disruptive kid who is pretty impulsive and unthinking. She stopped and was really thinking about this!


With the word puzzles, I made the kids work silently alone at first for a few minutes. Some were so angry, frustrated and confused, but I wouldn’t let them even ask a question. Then when they were told that they could work together to solve the problems, they were so excited, going from pairs to small groups, then around the classroom getting ideas from everyone... Then we talked about what it was like to work alone versus together and the differences were dramatic. It was a great illustration of the power of unity!


For the donkey problem, two kids were tied with yarn. I had the rest of the class brainstorm ideas then present the ideas to the “donkeys.” The donkeys had to decide what they were going to do, and they talked and selected one of the ideas and carried it out. We spoke about how great ideas come from teamwork, decisions are made through discussion and cooperation, and things get done well when people work together. Another great illustration of unity!


For the donkey problem, two kids were tied with yarn. I had the rest of the class brainstorm ideas then present the ideas to the “donkeys.” The donkeys had to decide what they were going to do, and they talked and selected one of the ideas and carried it out. We spoke about how great ideas come from teamwork, decisions are made through discussion and cooperation, and things get done well when people work together. Another great illustration of unity!

- Classroom bulletin board -

"We Are All One Connected Family"